Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning

Workshop Info

Date 07/09/2020, 2:00 PM

Workshop Description

Authors and scientists Mark A. McDaniel and Henry L. (Roddy) Roediger, III, join the Whiting School of Engineering’s EP Faculty Forward Fellowship program and the Hopkins community for a 60 minute interactive presentation followed by a 30 minute Q&A session into the science of successful learning. Participants will explore data from cognitive psychology and learn how to apply techniques to their teaching to help students achieve meaningful understanding of the material.

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Henry L. (Roddy) Roediger, III
Speaker

Roddy Roediger is the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor at Washington University in St. Louis, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Science. He graduated with a BA in Psychology from Washington & Lee University (1969) and received his PhD from Yale University (1973) in cognitive psychology. Roediger’s research has centered on human learning and memory, and he has published over 300 articles and chapters on various aspects of cognitive processes involved in remembering. His recent research has primarily focused on applying principles of cognitive psychology to improve learning in educational contexts, especially how testing (or retrieval practice) improves later retention. Retrieving an event or fact or story can strengthen their representation in memory and make them more likely to be retrieved in the future. He has published three textbooks that have been through a combined total of 23 editions and he has co-edited ten other books.
http://psych.wustl.edu/memory/roediger.html

Mark A. McDaniel
Speaker

Mark McDaniel is a Professor of Psychology, with a joint appointment in Education, at Washington University in St. Louis. He is the founding co-director of the university’s recently inaugurated Center for Integrative Research on Cognition, Learning, and Education. He graduated with an AB in Psychology and Mathematics from Oberlin College (1974) and received his PhD from the University of Colorado (1980). McDaniel is well-known for his work in the application of cognitive psychological principles to education. Over the past 30 years he has published over 200 articles, chapters, and edited books in the area of human learning and memory, with numerous papers focused on applying cognition to education. He has published two books to facilitate dissemination of research literatures pertinent to memory and to cognitive aging. https://psychweb.wustl.edu/mcdaniel